nprglobalhealth:

As Ebola Cases Spike, WHO Asks For More Money And Help
The world’s largest Ebola outbreak continues to surge at a troubling rate. The number of cases has climbed by nearly 20 percent in the past week, the World Health Organization said Tuesday.
At least 759 people have caught the hemorrhagic fever and 467 of those have died in three West African countries since March.
The WHO has been so concerned about the disease spreading to other countries that the agency held an emergency meeting this week in Accra, Ghana.
To contain this “unprecedented outbreak,” the agency said Thursday, it needs more people on the ground to find cases, and to track down the family, friends, co-workers and other contacts of these infected patients. The agency called for more money and better communication among the countries involved.
The WHO is also setting up an Ebola control center in Guinea to coordinate the effort.
As NPR’s Jason Beaubian explained Thursday on All Things Considered, while the outbreak shows signs of slowing down in Guinea, it continues to expand in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Ebola cases have appeared in more than 60 cities and villages, some far-flung — up to 400 miles apart. That’s about the distance between Boston and Baltimore.
So why has this outbreak been so hard to contain? Many factors have come together to create the crisis.
Continue reading.
Chart: The 2014 outbreak is the largest on record. Values are as of July 1. (Data from WHO/Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR)

nprglobalhealth:

As Ebola Cases Spike, WHO Asks For More Money And Help

The world’s largest Ebola outbreak continues to surge at a troubling rate. The number of cases has climbed by nearly 20 percent in the past week, the World Health Organization said Tuesday.

At least 759 people have caught the hemorrhagic fever and 467 of those have died in three West African countries since March.

The WHO has been so concerned about the disease spreading to other countries that the agency held an emergency meeting this week in Accra, Ghana.

To contain this “unprecedented outbreak,” the agency said Thursday, it needs more people on the ground to find cases, and to track down the family, friends, co-workers and other contacts of these infected patients. The agency called for more money and better communication among the countries involved.

The WHO is also setting up an Ebola control center in Guinea to coordinate the effort.

As NPR’s Jason Beaubian explained Thursday on All Things Considered, while the outbreak shows signs of slowing down in Guinea, it continues to expand in Liberia and Sierra Leone. Ebola cases have appeared in more than 60 cities and villages, some far-flung — up to 400 miles apart. That’s about the distance between Boston and Baltimore.

So why has this outbreak been so hard to contain? Many factors have come together to create the crisis.

Continue reading.

Chart: The 2014 outbreak is the largest on record. Values are as of July 1. (Data from WHO/Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR)

(via medicalschool)


fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Whooping Cough Reaches Epidemic Proportions in California.
With more than 800 new cases reported in just the last two weeks, California has officially reached “epidemic proportions” of whooping cough (pertussis). Typically the state sees 80 to 100 cases a month. Babies are the most vulnerable.
As of June 10, there have been 3,458 cases reported to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). That’s more than the number of reports for all of 2013, not to mention summer months are usually the worst. 
Two-thirds of pertussis hospitalizations have been in children four months or younger, and two infant deaths have already been reported. “We urge all pregnant women to get vaccinated,” CDPH director Ron Chapman says in a statement. “We also urge parents to vaccinate infants as soon as possible.” That also goes for anyone who expects to be around newborns.
The first dose of the pertussis vaccine can be given when an infant reaches 6 weeks of age. Infants who are too young to be immunized, however, remain the most vulnerable to severe and fatal cases. All pregnant women, the department urges, should be vaccinated with Tdap in their third trimester for each pregnancy — the immunity will transfer to the baby, at least temporarily. 
To be clear, whooping cough hasn’t been declared a public health emergency. When a disease exceeds anticipated levels, that’s when it’s considered an epidemic, according to CDPH’s Gil Chavez.Read the entire article here.Source: Los Angeles Times, I fucking love Science.

fuckyeahmedicalstuff:

Whooping Cough Reaches Epidemic Proportions in California.

With more than 800 new cases reported in just the last two weeks, California has officially reached “epidemic proportions” of whooping cough (pertussis). Typically the state sees 80 to 100 cases a month. Babies are the most vulnerable.

As of June 10, there have been 3,458 cases reported to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). That’s more than the number of reports for all of 2013, not to mention summer months are usually the worst. 

Two-thirds of pertussis hospitalizations have been in children four months or younger, and two infant deaths have already been reported. “We urge all pregnant women to get vaccinated,” CDPH director Ron Chapman says in a statement. “We also urge parents to vaccinate infants as soon as possible.” That also goes for anyone who expects to be around newborns.

The first dose of the pertussis vaccine can be given when an infant reaches 6 weeks of age. Infants who are too young to be immunized, however, remain the most vulnerable to severe and fatal cases. All pregnant women, the department urges, should be vaccinated with Tdap in their third trimester for each pregnancy — the immunity will transfer to the baby, at least temporarily. 

To be clear, whooping cough hasn’t been declared a public health emergency. When a disease exceeds anticipated levels, that’s when it’s considered an epidemic, according to CDPH’s Gil Chavez.

Read the entire article here.

Source: Los Angeles Times, I fucking love Science.




doctorswithoutborders:

Medical care has come under fire in South Sudan. Over 6 months, at least 58 people were killed on hospital grounds, including 25 patients and at least 2 Ministry of Health staff. Ambulances, medical equipment and hospitals were burned, looted, and destroyed. And hundreds of thousands of people have been cut off from health care. 

doctorswithoutborders:

Medical care has come under fire in South Sudan. Over 6 months, at least 58 people were killed on hospital grounds, including 25 patients and at least 2 Ministry of Health staff. Ambulances, medical equipment and hospitals were burned, looted, and destroyed. And hundreds of thousands of people have been cut off from health care. 


ladiesagainsthumanity:

RUTH. BADER. GINSBERG. 

via @sethdmichaels

(via upworthy)


(via yungabz)


doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Michael Goldfarb/MSF
This is the burned front gate of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in the town of Leer, South Sudan as of February 2014. The hospital was thoroughly looted, burned, ransacked, and effectively destroyed, along with most of Leer, sometime between the final days of January and early February 2014, leaving hundreds of thousands of people cut off from critical, lifesaving medical care. The hospital, opened by MSF 25 years ago, was the only secondary health care facility in Unity State, South Sudan. Hospitals have been ransacked in the towns of Bor, Malakal, Bentiu, Nasir and Leer, often during periods of heavy fighting. The damage goes far beyond the acts of violence themselves as vulnerable people are cut off from healthcare when they desperately need it.

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Michael Goldfarb/MSF

This is the burned front gate of the Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) hospital in the town of Leer, South Sudan as of February 2014. The hospital was thoroughly looted, burned, ransacked, and effectively destroyed, along with most of Leer, sometime between the final days of January and early February 2014, leaving hundreds of thousands of people cut off from critical, lifesaving medical care. The hospital, opened by MSF 25 years ago, was the only secondary health care facility in Unity State, South Sudan. Hospitals have been ransacked in the towns of Bor, Malakal, Bentiu, Nasir and Leer, often during periods of heavy fighting. The damage goes far beyond the acts of violence themselves as vulnerable people are cut off from healthcare when they desperately need it.